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Observe the Balinese Tradition of Salt Farming

品質保證新增到心願單
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The Balinese tradition of salt farming dates back almost a thousand years. This natural sea salt is harvested from the top surface of crystallized, unspoiled, sea water by the small farmers of Kusamba village, a traditional Balinese fishing village. Many generations have benefited from Kusamba’s unique geographical location, using their conventional method of harvesting, to produce natural salt with a truly distinctive texture and subtle flavour. This could be the last generation of salt farmers on Bali, and I am excited to bring you to see them before they disappear. When we get to Kusamba village, you will be able to try your hand at the process, first using teku-teku - a sea water container made of palm stem - to carry the sea water to a drying area. You then splash the water on this black sand, walking while shaking the teku-teku. The evaporation of seawater in the beds of black volcanic sands create pure distilled brine. The brine is then left to crystallise inside vessels made from coconut tree logs. The crystal salts that emerge on the surface of the brine are hand-raked and drained to remove the excess brine. You will be able to watch the villagers complete the process and even purchase this precious salt as a great souvenir. To complete an exciting day out however, we first make a pit stop at Kertagosa, the royal court of justice, where you can learn about the history of the kings of Klungkung from 1536 to 1908. After our time at Kusamba, we continue our journey to Tenganan village for a fascinating look at "ancient Bali". This is one of Bali's Aga villages - meaning its residents are considered the 'original' Balinese people and they maintain the original traditions and rules of ancient Bali, such as house design, religious ritual ceremony, and general way of life. Finally, we stop at the Tirtagangga water palace, whose gardens, huge koi fish and spring fed swimming pools are an amazing sight for some great photographs. We take a break for a simple lunch here, then head back through Bandem, a "snakefruit plantation village" which grows this ubiquitous Indonesian fruit.

The Balinese tradition of salt farming dates back almost a thousand years. This natural sea salt is harvested from the top surface of crystallized, unspoiled, sea water by the small farmers of Kusamba village, a traditional Balinese fishing village. Many generations have benefited from Kusamba’s unique geographical location, using their conventional method of harvesting, to produce natural salt with a truly distinctive texture and subtle flavour. This could be the last generation of salt farmers on Bali, and I am excited to bring you to see them before they disappear. When we get to Kusamba village, you will be able to try your hand at the process, first using teku-teku - a sea water container made of palm stem - to carry the sea water to a drying area. You then splash the water on this black sand, walking while shaking the teku-teku. The evaporation of seawater in the beds of black volcanic sands create pure distilled brine. The brine is then left to crystallise inside vessels made from coconut tree logs. The crystal salts that emerge on the surface of the brine are hand-raked and drained to remove the excess brine. You will be able to watch the villagers complete the process and even purchase this precious salt as a great souvenir. To complete an exciting day out however, we first make a pit stop at Kertagosa, the royal court of justice, where you can learn about the history of the kings of Klungkung from 1536 to 1908. After our time at Kusamba, we continue our journey to Tenganan village for a fascinating look at "ancient Bali". This is one of Bali's Aga villages - meaning its residents are considered the 'original' Balinese people and they maintain the original traditions and rules of ancient Bali, such as house design, religious ritual ceremony, and general way of life. Finally, we stop at the Tirtagangga water palace, whose gardens, huge koi fish and spring fed swimming pools are an amazing sight for some great photographs. We take a break for a simple lunch here, then head back through Bandem, a "snakefruit plantation village" which grows this ubiquitous Indonesian fruit.

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