Enjoy a Full Day at Hong Kong's Famous Geopark

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The ever-surprising Hong Kong has a myriad of interesting landforms. The long and sinuous coastline is a natural geological gallery, featuring spectacular landforms and rock formations formed by volcanic activities 140 million years ago and shaped by waves and weathering. The Hong Kong Geopark, opened November 2009, comprises of eight major geological sites and is of International stature. The High Island Reservoir opened in 1978, was built as a direct result of the water shutdown by mainland China, during the 1967 riots, in order to alleviate Hong Kong's fresh water shortage with a capacity of approximately 273 million cubic metres. The construction, contracted by a Japanese company, cost more than HKD $400 million and spanned a 10 year period. This beautiful area was virtually inaccessible until the 1970s. Our walking tour starts alongside the reservoir, in the Sai Kung East Country Park, and journeys to its easternmost end. From here we view the magnificent hexagonal columnar joints, one of the largest geological formations of this kind in the world. We walk in this area and further around the corner to take in the view of Long Ke. Here we can see how wind and water has crafted unique sea caves along the Sai Kung Peninsula coastline. Coming back along the reservoir service road we travel by taxi on part of the famous 100km MacLehose hiking trail and into the Sai Kung Country Park. Both sections of the walk afford either turquoise blue reservoir or terrific sea views out to the many surrounding islands. We leave the service road to join a lush green pathway used by villagers many years ago. From above we view the site of a refugee camp for Vietnamese boat people (closed 1998), an island for fishermen's graves, Hong Kong's only public golf courses on Kai Sai Chau and marine fish farms. We end the tour with a visit to the Sheung Yiu Hakka Village Museum, a Hakka settlement. This is a compact and carefully preserved village, situated along the Lung Hang River. A Hakka clan named Wong settled here 150 years ago when the coast was plagued by pirates and waterborne bandits. The village features homes built behind stout stone walls on a protective knoll, overlooking a narrow cove. The villagers moved on in the 1950s, around the same time farming began a gradual decline in Hong Kong.

The ever-surprising Hong Kong has a myriad of interesting landforms. The long and sinuous coastline is a natural geological gallery, featuring spectacular landforms and rock formations formed by volcanic activities 140 million years ago and shaped by waves and weathering. The Hong Kong Geopark, opened November 2009, comprises of eight major geological sites and is of International stature. The High Island Reservoir opened in 1978, was built as a direct result of the water shutdown by mainland China, during the 1967 riots, in order to alleviate Hong Kong's fresh water shortage with a capacity of approximately 273 million cubic metres. The construction, contracted by a Japanese company, cost more than HKD $400 million and spanned a 10 year period. This beautiful area was virtually inaccessible until the 1970s. Our walking tour starts alongside the reservoir, in the Sai Kung East Country Park, and journeys to its easternmost end. From here we view the magnificent hexagonal columnar joints, one of the largest geological formations of this kind in the world. We walk in this area and further around the corner to take in the view of Long Ke. Here we can see how wind and water has crafted unique sea caves along the Sai Kung Peninsula coastline. Coming back along the reservoir service road we travel by taxi on part of the famous 100km MacLehose hiking trail and into the Sai Kung Country Park. Both sections of the walk afford either turquoise blue reservoir or terrific sea views out to the many surrounding islands. We leave the service road to join a lush green pathway used by villagers many years ago. From above we view the site of a refugee camp for Vietnamese boat people (closed 1998), an island for fishermen's graves, Hong Kong's only public golf courses on Kai Sai Chau and marine fish farms. We end the tour with a visit to the Sheung Yiu Hakka Village Museum, a Hakka settlement. This is a compact and carefully preserved village, situated along the Lung Hang River. A Hakka clan named Wong settled here 150 years ago when the coast was plagued by pirates and waterborne bandits. The village features homes built behind stout stone walls on a protective knoll, overlooking a narrow cove. The villagers moved on in the 1950s, around the same time farming began a gradual decline in Hong Kong.

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