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Become a Samurai in Tokyo for a day!

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Want to try a Samurai Armor on? At out dojo, you will be able to wear the traditional samurai armor. This short experience is intended for Japanese cosplayers who want to try a real armor on and have photos taken. International travellers can take thes course, but please know that this is not an introductory class to teach histories or philosophies. This experience will give you an insight into the Japanese culture. It takes about 15 minutes to have a traditional armor on. Photo taking time is approximately 15 minutes. Please read the following explanations before you come to our dojo. About yoroi (armor) The samurai armor is usually very colorful and sometimes very ornate. The warriors wanted to stand out in front of their lords. They wanted their lords to notice them in the battlefield. And when they die, they wanted to die gourgeously. Those who wore red armors were regarded most valiant. The samurai armor was always designed for mobility. A good suit of armor had to be sturdy, yet flexible enough to allow its wearer free movement in the battlefield. The armor was made of lacquered plates of either leather or metal, carefully bound together by laces of leather or silk. The arms were protected by large, rectangular shoulder shields and light, armored sleeves. The warrior's face and brow were protected by a piece of armor that tied around behind the head and under the helmet. The most famous feature of the helmet was its Darth Vader–like neck guard (Darth Vader’s design was actually influenced by samurai helmets). It defended the wearer from arrows and swords coming from all angles. Many helmets also featured ornaments and attachable pieces, including a mustachioed, demonic mask that both protected the face and frightened the enemy. About Weapons As soldiers, samurai employed a number of different weapons. They originally carried a straight blade called "chokuto." As sword-making techniques progressed, the samurai switched to curved swords, which eventually evolved into the katana. The katana is perhaps the most famous sword type in the world and certainly the most iconic of all samurai weapons. Bushido (the code of warriors) dictated that a samurai’s soul was in his katana, which made it the most important weapon he carried. Katanas were usually carried with a smaller blade in a pair called “daisho,” which was a status symbol used exclusively by the samurai class. In battles, the samurai warriors commonly used the yumi, a longbow they practiced religiously with. Then, spears. When gunpowder was introduced in the 16th century, the samurai abandoned their bows in favor of firearms and cannons. Their long-distance weapon of choice was the tanegashima, a flintlock rifle that became popular among Edo-era samurai and their footmen. Cannons and other gunpowder weapons were also commonly employed. In the period of "Warring States" in the latter half of the 16th century, personal bravery on the battlefield was replaced by meticulous planning and tactics. About Bushido -The code of warriors The life of the Samurai not only became one of discipline and military education, but a rich cultivation of the spirit and mind through the arts of writing, painting, calligraphy, philosophy, etc. Zen Buddhism and Confucianism provided the warrior class with personal enlightenment, and refinement. The unwritten Samurai code of conduct, known as Bushido, held that the true warrior must hold loyalty, courage, veracity, compassion, and honor as important, above all else. An appreciation and respect of life was also imperative, as it added balance to the warrior character of the Samurai. He was often very stoic with a deep and strong philosophical passion. He could be deadly in combat and yet so gentle and compassionate with children and the weak. This Stoicism was realized out of a genuine respect for life and also for death.

Want to try a Samurai Armor on? At out dojo, you will be able to wear the traditional samurai armor. This short experience is intended for Japanese cosplayers who want to try a real armor on and have photos taken. International travellers can take thes course, but please know that this is not an introductory class to teach histories or philosophies. This experience will give you an insight into the Japanese culture. It takes about 15 minutes to have a traditional armor on. Photo taking time is approximately 15 minutes. Please read the following explanations before you come to our dojo. About yoroi (armor) The samurai armor is usually very colorful and sometimes very ornate. The warriors wanted to stand out in front of their lords. They wanted their lords to notice them in the battlefield. And when they die, they wanted to die gourgeously. Those who wore red armors were regarded most valiant. The samurai armor was always designed for mobility. A good suit of armor had to be sturdy, yet flexible enough to allow its wearer free movement in the battlefield. The armor was made of lacquered plates of either leather or metal, carefully bound together by laces of leather or silk. The arms were protected by large, rectangular shoulder shields and light, armored sleeves. The warrior's face and brow were protected by a piece of armor that tied around behind the head and under the helmet. The most famous feature of the helmet was its Darth Vader–like neck guard (Darth Vader’s design was actually influenced by samurai helmets). It defended the wearer from arrows and swords coming from all angles. Many helmets also featured ornaments and attachable pieces, including a mustachioed, demonic mask that both protected the face and frightened the enemy. About Weapons As soldiers, samurai employed a number of different weapons. They originally carried a straight blade called "chokuto." As sword-making techniques progressed, the samurai switched to curved swords, which eventually evolved into the katana. The katana is perhaps the most famous sword type in the world and certainly the most iconic of all samurai weapons. Bushido (the code of warriors) dictated that a samurai’s soul was in his katana, which made it the most important weapon he carried. Katanas were usually carried with a smaller blade in a pair called “daisho,” which was a status symbol used exclusively by the samurai class. In battles, the samurai warriors commonly used the yumi, a longbow they practiced religiously with. Then, spears. When gunpowder was introduced in the 16th century, the samurai abandoned their bows in favor of firearms and cannons. Their long-distance weapon of choice was the tanegashima, a flintlock rifle that became popular among Edo-era samurai and their footmen. Cannons and other gunpowder weapons were also commonly employed. In the period of "Warring States" in the latter half of the 16th century, personal bravery on the battlefield was replaced by meticulous planning and tactics. About Bushido -The code of warriors The life of the Samurai not only became one of discipline and military education, but a rich cultivation of the spirit and mind through the arts of writing, painting, calligraphy, philosophy, etc. Zen Buddhism and Confucianism provided the warrior class with personal enlightenment, and refinement. The unwritten Samurai code of conduct, known as Bushido, held that the true warrior must hold loyalty, courage, veracity, compassion, and honor as important, above all else. An appreciation and respect of life was also imperative, as it added balance to the warrior character of the Samurai. He was often very stoic with a deep and strong philosophical passion. He could be deadly in combat and yet so gentle and compassionate with children and the weak. This Stoicism was realized out of a genuine respect for life and also for death.